All sound is a form of energy. At SoundBenefits, we’ve taken the basic dimensions of sound and created a numerical representation of the energy in human speech. Using that as a jumping off point, we measured the percentages of impairment and correction to create a new measurement that describes hearing loss. We call it HearScore.

A New Way to Talk About Hearing Loss

Your HearScore puts your current hearing into the context of a ten-point scale. After taking our virtual Pro-Led assessment or the self-assessment, your results will come in the form of a HearScore ranging from 10 (almost perfect hearing) to 1 (needs significant amplification). With each score, you’ll learn:

  • Examples of typical hearing experiences/what you can expect
  • What you might be missing at your current HearScore
  • How well you can hear in a noisy environment
  • How well you can hear someone wearing a mask
  • How much your hearing could be improved with hearing aids

Accurately Predicting Patient Outcomes


When you get your HearScore results, one of the most exciting things you’ll see is a prediction of how much your hearing could be improved with hearing aids. This is a big deal in the world of audiology – while the quantification technology has existed, until now, no one has had the extensive data needed to extrapolate and confirm how much hearing performance could be improved with correction. SoundBenefits is pioneering this predictive HearScore methodology.

At SoundBenefits, we filtered years of anonymous patient data that tracked the experiences of people with different hearing losses when given amplification. We made predictions of what their improvements could be and then tested these against the actual patient performance data to refine our numbers and develop highly accurate predictive scores. While these scores can’t take every factor of hearing loss into account, we have enough data to make reasonable predictions that we can share with our patients.

An Innovative Approach Takes The Right Partners

We recognize that to do the most groundbreaking work, we need smart partners. That’s why we’ve collaborated with scientists and researchers at several leading universities and research institutions to crunch the data and ensure that HearScore is highly accurate. It’s just one of the ways we’re developing new innovations to evaluate and talk about hearing loss. Together, we’re making a real difference in the lives of our patients.

Want to find out your HearScore? Take the virtual Pro-Led assessment or the self-assessment now.

Know Your HearScore

With a HearScore of 10, you can likely:
  • Hear very well in most circumstances
  • Continue to protect your hearing by avoiding loud noises and wearing earplugs when necessary
With a HearScore of 9, you can likely:
  • Still enjoy your favorite music and hear conversations with family and friends
  • Mostly understand speech in noisy restaurants
  • Understand someone even if you can’t see their face
  • Hear the TV when the volume is at a level that is comfortable for everyone else
  • Usually understand both male and female voices over the phone
With a HearScore of 8, you can likely:
  • Still enjoy your favorite music and hear conversations with family and friends
  • Still understand speech in noisy restaurants
  • More often than not understand someone even if you can’t see their face
  • Hear the TV when the volume is at a level that is comfortable for everyone else
  • Understand both male and female voices over the phone
With a HearScore of 7, you may:
  • Have to ask people to speak a little louder
  • Be accused of having “selective hearing”
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech where there is background noise
  • Have difficulty understanding speech when more than one person is talking
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • Have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 6, you may:
  • Have to ask people to speak a little louder or repeat themselves
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Have trouble understanding someone if you cannot see their face
  • Have difficulty understanding speech when in a car
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • Have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 5, you may:
  • Have to ask people to speak a little louder or repeat themselves
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Respond inappropriately or not know when someone is talking to you
  • Be able to hear speech but have difficulty understanding the words
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • Have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 4, you may:
  • Have to ask people to speak a little louder or repeat themselves
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Respond inappropriately or not know when someone is talking to you
  • Have to increase the volume of the TV loud enough to bother others
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • Have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 3, you may:
  • Have to ask people to speak louder or repeat themselves
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Notice you can hear speech but have difficulty understanding the words
  • Have to increase the volume of the TV loud enough to bother others
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • Have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 2, you likely:
  • Have to ask people to speak louder or repeat themselves
  • Have more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Are able to hear speech but have difficulty understanding the words
  • Feel stress during social gatherings because it is difficult to understand conversations
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • May have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
With a HearScore of 1, you probably:
  • Have to ask people to speak louder or repeat themselves
  • Notice more difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise
  • Notice you can hear speech but have difficulty understanding the words
  • Have avoided social gatherings because it is too difficult to follow conversations
  • Hear from your kids and/or spouse that they think you have a hearing problem
  • May have tinnitus (ringing in the ears)